Paying for what once was free

“I fear that he who walks over these fields a century hence will not know the pleasure of knocking off wild apples. Ah, poor man, there are many pleasures which he will not know!… And the end of it all will be that we shall be compelled to look for our apples in a barrel.” — Henry  David Thoreau

The other day as I was walking along the beach watching fisherman cast their lines into the waves, a thought struck me. I thought about food and the world’s resources, and how they used to be available to anyone with a little bit of ingenuity and energy. How fish were plentiful, uncontaminated, and didn’t require a license; how native peoples freely hunted and gathered what they required, and how so many people used to have everything they needed outside their front door. Instead of going to work to earn money to buy food and shelter and clothing, they worked to grow their food, build and maintain their shelter, and produce their clothing.

Recently, the state of Oregon criminalized the collection of rain water, which is a key component of what is called permaculture. Permaculture is about sustainability and self-sufficiency; about producing what you need without relying on others or big government, while living in an eco-conscious and harmonious way with the world around you.

Similar situations include:

• California has declared war on small, local fresh milk farmers and distributors

• Michigan has criminalized small, local ranchers and animal operations.

• A city in Michigan has also tried to criminalize home gardens.

• The city of Tulsa, Oklahoma sent out a “destruction crew” to chop down a woman’s edible landscaping garden of over 100 varieties of foods and medicinal herbs.

Beyond these incidents, it is undeniable that we are living in a world that is becoming increasingly privatized. Henry David Thoreau once wrote:

“The era of the Wild Apple will soon be past. It is a fruit which will probably become extinct in New England…. Since the temperance reform and the general introduction of grafted fruit, no native apple trees, such as I see everywhere in deserted pastures, and where the woods have grown up around them, are set out. I fear that he who walks over these fields a century hence will not know the pleasure of knocking off wild apples. Ah, poor man, there are many pleasures which he will not know!… Now that they have grafted trees, and pay a price for them, they collect them into a play by their houses, and fence them in,—and the end of it all will be that we shall be compelled to look for our apples in a barrel.”

Poor man indeed. Not only are we bereft of being able to knock down wild apples as we please, but most wild, organically grown (organic as used in the original sense) plant life has been decimated, with multinational corporations like Monsanto replacing them with industrialized, genetically modified, nutritionally deficient, pesticide-laden monocultures.

If you have the means and all the permits, you can start your own organic farm and produce at home. But the vast majority of Americans are at the complete mercy of the food industry. If prices go up, we have to pay them. If they refuse to label GMOs, we have to eat them.

The $7.25 hourly federal minimum wage has not increased since 2009 and represents less, when adjusted for inflation, than minimum-wage workers earned in 1968. Our hard-earned dollars have less and less purchasing power as the years go by, and if oil prices continue to rise, this could become a serious problem. This is one of the reasons I hope to someday live off-the-grid and be totally self-sufficient. It protects you from catastrophes, shortages and exorbitant prices, while ensuring you have a high-quality, pure, nutritionally rich food source. Our agrarian antecedents had to toil for their daily bread, but they never had to worry about commutes or getting laid off (although they did have to worry about other things, such as droughts and long winters).

In such hardships, or if you weren’t able to produce everything you needed yourself, a community that traded and otherwise supported one another would be ideal. I’m not suggesting a reversion to the 19th century, but a fusion of permaculture principles with 21st century knowledge and technologies.

Other fields that have become totally privatized and often financially extort the average citizen are education and health care. Home schooling and natural remedies can often be superior — and far less expensive — than their private counterparts.

Natural News founder Mike Adams expressed his concern thus:

“What’s the pattern here? Total state domination over all resources — land, water, food, medicine and more. This is part of the ongoing effort to crush self reliance in America and turn everybody into a mindless, hopeless slave of the state, living on USDA food stamps and eating corporate-engineered GMO.

“Freedom means being able to speak your mind, capture your rainwater, bask in the sun, grow trees, raise backyard chickens, home school your children, say NO to vaccines, defend your life and property against looters and violent crime. Freedom is what once made America great, and it is the crushing of freedom which is now destroying America.

“In Oregon, California, Michigan, Washington D.C. and everywhere around the world where evil bureaucrats seek total power over all of humanity, our natural, divine rights are being viciously stripped away. Our money supply is being eroded at an accelerating rate. Our right to due process has been nullified by our own President. Our right to free speech is being increasingly censored and stifled. Our right to grow our own home gardens is under constant assault. (http://www.naturalnews.com/036234_edible_landscaping_medicinal_plants…)

“The common cause behind all these attacks on freedom is “collectivism” — the idea that individuals have no value and that only the state can provide life, food and an economy. This is accomplished through endless permit requirements that now make running something like an organic farm a paperwork nightmare.Similarly, the passage of the Food Safety Modernization Act late last year will absolutely devastate small, local farms once it fully kicks in.

“With every new regulation, inspection, permit and government burden placed upon farms and land owners, we are increasingly destroying our own futures by placing more power in the hands of tyrannical government. We are all becoming indentured servants to the state.“Think you OWN your land? Try not paying property tax for a year. You’ll find out very quickly that you don’t own anything. The state owns it. You are just paying rent.”

While perhaps rather dramatic and extreme, he does make some good points! Similarly, people used to be able to move freely throughout the country. Now you have to pay to camp in state and national parks and get permits to raft down rivers, as Christopher McCandless finds out in Into the Wild.

Not everything is owned by private industry or government, but it is drastically more so than it was a century ago, and the trend is continuing in that direction; most people predict that all water sources will soon be privately held and companies will charge citizens whatever they decide to drink what once they were able to freely enjoy.

 

 

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2 responses to “Paying for what once was free

  1. I like you’re ideas, but I think you might be giving people too much credit. For one, if the government didn’t set aside large areas (i.e. National Parks) the private industry would no doubt build gaudy hotels and hideous strip malls in some of our nation’s most beautiful areas. Second, before permits and regulations came into play, our rivers, soil, and aquifers were heavily polluted with industry chemicals. Over fishing decimated our eastern shores and they have yet to recover, and probably never will. As for the rain water in Oregon, if you are collecting rain water run-off in barrels for sustainability, that is not illegal. It sounds like it becomes illegal when you prevent large amounts of rain water from running into the river, with an earthen dam, for example.
    Who knows what the answer is to all this. As a country we take care of our natural places far better than any other, undoubtedly. So… it could be worse?

    • Emily, you make excellent comments, as usual. Yes I am aware there are benefits to government regulation and privatization — the sad part occurs when everything becomes bought up and hence is no longer available for use without proper documentation or a fee. I think that with the burgeoning population and globalization trends, that we are heading more and more in that direction. For example, I know that BLM land does exist (and, as a former state parks employee with an ornithologist beau, I know you are more familiar with it than I am) but I just get wistful about the time when this country had a lot of undeveloped wilderness that anyone could roam freely in and enjoy; set up camp, built a homestead, etc. But of course, progress happens. And you are correct about Oregon as well, that may not have been the best example. I see it more as indicative of a growing trend or a warning of what possibly might someday be. I’m not sure, however, that we take the best care of our natural resources — the Environmental Performance Index (EPI) ranks the top five countries as Switzerland, Latvia , Norway, Luxembourg, and Costa Rica with the U.S. a dismal 49th. And if we get into hydraulic fracturing (which by the way, many natural gas extraction companies have set up camp all over BLM lands) it could be detrimental to our waterways. Anyways, thanks for your thoughts I hope to talk to you soon.

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