Tag Archives: food

Paying for what once was free

“I fear that he who walks over these fields a century hence will not know the pleasure of knocking off wild apples. Ah, poor man, there are many pleasures which he will not know!… And the end of it all will be that we shall be compelled to look for our apples in a barrel.” — Henry  David Thoreau

The other day as I was walking along the beach watching fisherman cast their lines into the waves, a thought struck me. I thought about food and the world’s resources, and how they used to be available to anyone with a little bit of ingenuity and energy. How fish were plentiful, uncontaminated, and didn’t require a license; how native peoples freely hunted and gathered what they required, and how so many people used to have everything they needed outside their front door. Instead of going to work to earn money to buy food and shelter and clothing, they worked to grow their food, build and maintain their shelter, and produce their clothing.

Recently, the state of Oregon criminalized the collection of rain water, which is a key component of what is called permaculture. Permaculture is about sustainability and self-sufficiency; about producing what you need without relying on others or big government, while living in an eco-conscious and harmonious way with the world around you.

Similar situations include:

• California has declared war on small, local fresh milk farmers and distributors

• Michigan has criminalized small, local ranchers and animal operations.

• A city in Michigan has also tried to criminalize home gardens.

• The city of Tulsa, Oklahoma sent out a “destruction crew” to chop down a woman’s edible landscaping garden of over 100 varieties of foods and medicinal herbs.

Beyond these incidents, it is undeniable that we are living in a world that is becoming increasingly privatized. Henry David Thoreau once wrote:

“The era of the Wild Apple will soon be past. It is a fruit which will probably become extinct in New England…. Since the temperance reform and the general introduction of grafted fruit, no native apple trees, such as I see everywhere in deserted pastures, and where the woods have grown up around them, are set out. I fear that he who walks over these fields a century hence will not know the pleasure of knocking off wild apples. Ah, poor man, there are many pleasures which he will not know!… Now that they have grafted trees, and pay a price for them, they collect them into a play by their houses, and fence them in,—and the end of it all will be that we shall be compelled to look for our apples in a barrel.”

Poor man indeed. Not only are we bereft of being able to knock down wild apples as we please, but most wild, organically grown (organic as used in the original sense) plant life has been decimated, with multinational corporations like Monsanto replacing them with industrialized, genetically modified, nutritionally deficient, pesticide-laden monocultures.

If you have the means and all the permits, you can start your own organic farm and produce at home. But the vast majority of Americans are at the complete mercy of the food industry. If prices go up, we have to pay them. If they refuse to label GMOs, we have to eat them.

The $7.25 hourly federal minimum wage has not increased since 2009 and represents less, when adjusted for inflation, than minimum-wage workers earned in 1968. Our hard-earned dollars have less and less purchasing power as the years go by, and if oil prices continue to rise, this could become a serious problem. This is one of the reasons I hope to someday live off-the-grid and be totally self-sufficient. It protects you from catastrophes, shortages and exorbitant prices, while ensuring you have a high-quality, pure, nutritionally rich food source. Our agrarian antecedents had to toil for their daily bread, but they never had to worry about commutes or getting laid off (although they did have to worry about other things, such as droughts and long winters).

In such hardships, or if you weren’t able to produce everything you needed yourself, a community that traded and otherwise supported one another would be ideal. I’m not suggesting a reversion to the 19th century, but a fusion of permaculture principles with 21st century knowledge and technologies.

Other fields that have become totally privatized and often financially extort the average citizen are education and health care. Home schooling and natural remedies can often be superior — and far less expensive — than their private counterparts.

Natural News founder Mike Adams expressed his concern thus:

“What’s the pattern here? Total state domination over all resources — land, water, food, medicine and more. This is part of the ongoing effort to crush self reliance in America and turn everybody into a mindless, hopeless slave of the state, living on USDA food stamps and eating corporate-engineered GMO.

“Freedom means being able to speak your mind, capture your rainwater, bask in the sun, grow trees, raise backyard chickens, home school your children, say NO to vaccines, defend your life and property against looters and violent crime. Freedom is what once made America great, and it is the crushing of freedom which is now destroying America.

“In Oregon, California, Michigan, Washington D.C. and everywhere around the world where evil bureaucrats seek total power over all of humanity, our natural, divine rights are being viciously stripped away. Our money supply is being eroded at an accelerating rate. Our right to due process has been nullified by our own President. Our right to free speech is being increasingly censored and stifled. Our right to grow our own home gardens is under constant assault. (http://www.naturalnews.com/036234_edible_landscaping_medicinal_plants…)

“The common cause behind all these attacks on freedom is “collectivism” — the idea that individuals have no value and that only the state can provide life, food and an economy. This is accomplished through endless permit requirements that now make running something like an organic farm a paperwork nightmare.Similarly, the passage of the Food Safety Modernization Act late last year will absolutely devastate small, local farms once it fully kicks in.

“With every new regulation, inspection, permit and government burden placed upon farms and land owners, we are increasingly destroying our own futures by placing more power in the hands of tyrannical government. We are all becoming indentured servants to the state.“Think you OWN your land? Try not paying property tax for a year. You’ll find out very quickly that you don’t own anything. The state owns it. You are just paying rent.”

While perhaps rather dramatic and extreme, he does make some good points! Similarly, people used to be able to move freely throughout the country. Now you have to pay to camp in state and national parks and get permits to raft down rivers, as Christopher McCandless finds out in Into the Wild.

Not everything is owned by private industry or government, but it is drastically more so than it was a century ago, and the trend is continuing in that direction; most people predict that all water sources will soon be privately held and companies will charge citizens whatever they decide to drink what once they were able to freely enjoy.

 

 

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Spice things up tonight

Spices are one of nature’s and God’s great gifts to mankind. Otherwise known as herbs, these medicinal plants offer amazing healing benefits. Whether fresh or dried, they help fight cancer, Alzheimer’s and aging and boost your heart, immune system, metabolism, and brain power. Basically, they keep you looking and feeling young, healthy and sharp. You can get their benefits topically in the form of essential oils, or you can use them to add that special something to your dinner. Listing all the different types of herbs and their uses and benefits would fill a book, and indeed there are many on the subject. Here are a few of the spices I use most frequently, along with a few of the great things they do (click on the source to read more in-depth).

Rosemary — Anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, anti-fungal and anti-septic; rich source of minerals like potassium, calcium, iron, manganese, copper, and magnesium. (Source: http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/rosemary-herb.html)

Oregano — Anti-parasitical and anti-fungal, effective Candida treatment (it also only kills the harmful fungi, without affecting the natural intestinal flora);  treatments of gastrointestinal problems, headaches, respiratory illnesses and certain menstrual irregularities; rich in antioxidants. (Source: http://www.oreganobenefits.net/)

Basil — Exceptionally high levels of beta-carotene, vitamin A, cryptoxanthin, lutein andzea-xanthin. These compounds help act as protective scavengers against oxygen-derived free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a role in aging and various disease process; Zeaxanthin, a yellow flavonoid carotenoid compound, is selectively absorbed into the retinal macula lutea where it found to filter harmful UV rays from reaching retina and help to protect from age related macular disease (AMRD), especially in the elderly; Vitamin A is known to have antioxidant properties and is essential for vision. It is also required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and to help body protect from lung and oral cavity cancers; Vitamin K in basil is essential for many coagulant factors in the blood and plays vital role in the bone strengthening function by helping mineralization process in the bones. (Source: http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/basil-herb.html)

Parsley — Anti-cancer properties; antioxidant; boosts immune system; anti-inflammatory; vitamins C, A and K; promotes healthy heart. (Source: http://www.healthdiaries.com/eatthis/6-health-benefits-of-parsley.html)

Cinnamon — Treats colds, indigestion, headaces and cramps and also believed to improve energy, vitality and circulation; lowers bad cholesterol and stabilizes blood sugar; anti-fungal; fights leukemia; relieves arthritis; anti-clotting properties; boosts memory and cognitive function. (Source: http://www.organicauthority.com/health/11-health-benefits-of-cinnamon.html)

I like to sprinkle rosemary on chopped yukon gold potatoes. I add olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic powder and paprika and bake in the oven until crispy. Great with ketchup and a healthy alternative to french fries. Oregano is good in meat sauce and on pizza, while basil is a must-have on pasta and caprese salad. My grandma always said, you can never have too much basil. Ah, basil, how I love you. Fresh or dried, I pile it on. It is so fragrant and enticing. Parsley is good on fish with some fresh-squeezed lemon juice. I also put it on my organic macaroni and cheese! Cinnamon is good in apple sauce and I ALWAYS put it in my coffee (along with raw sugar, almond milk and raw cocoa powder).

But there are so many more delectable options, each full of their unique tasty zing (especially if locally grown — try to cultivate your own!) and medicinal magic. Click here to read about more spices and their benefits (like garlic, sage and curry) and here and here to learn about what foods to pair them with.

Beautiful bacteria

Do you suffer from any of the following: fatigue, headaches, irritability, yeast or urinary tract infections, skin problems, constipation, digestive issues, anxiety, or frequent colds?

Many common health problems arise from a bacterial imbalance in the digestive tract, which is home to over 400 bacterial species. These little guys help you synthesize vitamins and nutrients, filter toxins and power your immune system. When their numbers are in decline, you are definitely going to feel “off.”

Beneficial bacteria — which we receive at birth — is often killed off by antibiotics and other strong medications. Poor diet and emotional stress can exacerbate the issue. Some people experience the above symptoms, but more severe situations can arise: Crohn’s disease, IBS and even colon cancer.

To keep your system healthy, make sure you eat plenty of yogurt. Make sure it is high quality with only natural ingredients and a good dose of live probiotics. You can also get probiotics in pill and liquid form (do your research to make sure you are getting the kind that will stay alive all the way to your digestive tract; otherwise they can be killed by stomach acid and will do you no good). I get a bottle of liquid acidophilus from Whole Foods and add it to my smoothies. The taste of a good yogurt, full of live cultures, is delicious: creamy and tangy. For those who are lactose intolerant, try goat’s milk yogurt or kefir. You can always add wild honey to sweeten it up (also delicious with fruit and Grape Nuts).

You can also get live strains of bacteria from fermented foods and raw soy sauce. If you get enough of these yummy little organisms, you will improve your mood and energy level, prevent illness, and actually look better. Eating lots of yogurt will keep your complexion looking pretty. Learn more here.

Listen to yourself

The U.S. health and fitness industry, which includes the weight loss industry, is worth $60 billion a year. There are infinite plans, pills and programs; many people struggle on a daily basis to regulate caloric intake and mindlessly go for anything with “Low Fat” plastered on it.

Interesting that before the Industrial Revolution, there was no such thing as ‘organic.’ Everything was grown in nutrient-rich soil, without pesticides, and all meat was free-range and untainted. There was also really no such thing as exercise, at least how it is now construed. People were naturally active on a daily basis.

I suppose my point isn’t all that profound: just that you don’t need any special regimen at all. You just need to walk and run and move more, every day. You don’t need to have a dietitian or a book or a celebrity or a commercial or a product package to tell you what to eat. You just have to use some common sense (just because an avocado is filled with fat does not mean it is bad; whole unpasteurized milk is superior to skim milk laced with antibiotics) and try to listen to what your body is telling you.

If you are free from addictions to MSG, salt, sugar and other processed foods and additives, then you can follow your cravings to what your body may need. For example, if you find yourself craving sweet potatoes, you may be deficient in vitamin A. If you love clam chowder, your body might be appreciatively gobbling up all that iron and zinc. Love tomato sauce-slathered pasta and orange juice? (Yes.) You may need to stock up on Vitamin C. Even wanting to indulge in dark chocolate means that your body may require a little burst of mood-boosting serotonin.

There are endless good things to eat and drink, each filled with unique and miraculously beneficial compositions of minerals, amino acids, antioxidants and/or nutrients. And to have them all on hand 24/7 at the corner grocery store — I know I have the Industrial Revolution to thank for that.

I would just like to point out that there is no need to pay for any person, program or pill, or to even count calories. It’s all about the quality of ingredients and if the food product is pure and unadulterated. If you eat only high-caliber, whole foods, and eat only when you are hungry, and follow your cravings, plus walk a lot more than you sit, then you should not have much of a problem with your weight, metabolism or health.